11 Fun Facts on ‘Get Pumped Up’ Day

Hump Day is cancelled, today is Get Pumped Up Day.

Throughout my athletic career I’ve played “big games” at nearly every level. And looking back, it’s difficult to fully describe the range of emotions an athlete feels when they get pumped up for the biggest game of their season.

You know your emotions will be running wild but you can’t let them get the better of you. You are ready to explode with energy but need to control it so you don’t burn out. You are tired of waiting and eager to take the field, but you know that once you do you can’t hold anything back.

I don’t think I’ve ever been more pumped up for a sporting event than for this Sunday’s NFC Championship in Seattle. More so than any other time, this is the one game where I wish I was on that field playing for the home team.

Don’t feel the same way? Watch this video and try not to run through a brick wall once you’re done. Hell, I had trouble staying in my seat while watching this the first time.

I’ve had coworkers ask me if I’m “nervous” leading up to this game. It’s part of your standard water cooler sports conversations during the NFL season; ask an NFL fan about their team’s upcoming opponent, discussing their team’s chances of winning and then offer the typical “good luck” as you both head back to your cubicles.

I’m not so much nervous as I am extremely excited.

As a Seahawks fan, I know that our team has an opportunity to beat the “other” best team in the NFC, claim bragging rights and advance to our second Super Bowl in franchise history. As an NFL fan, you get to watch two teams that are almost statistically identical, that have fanbases who detest the other, and players and coaches who want nothing more than to shut up the opposition.

Division foes, playing for a conference championship. Is it Sunday yet?

  Pass YPG (Rank) Rush YPG(Rank)
Seattle Offense 202.3 (26) 136.8 (4)
San Francisco Offense 186.2 (30) 137.6 (3)
Seattle Defense 172 (1) 101.6 (7)
San Francisco Defense 221 (7) 95.9 (4)

11 Fun Facts

  • The Seahawks and the 49ers have played each other 30 times, never once in the playoffs, and the overall record for both teams is 15-15.
  • Pete Carroll and Jim Harbaugh have coached against each other nine times between college and the pros. Harbaugh holds the edge with a 6-3 record.
  • Pete Carroll’s Seahawks have won two NFC West titles in four seasons. Harbaugh’s Niners won the NFC West the other two seasons.
  • The Seahawks were the most penalized team in the league with 134 total penalties, San Fran had 111. However, the 49ers committed 49 pre-snap penalties to the Seahawks’ 46.
  • Seattle was the beneficiary of 106 penalties for 953 yards. San Francisco benefited from 107 penalties for 971 yards.
  • Frank Gore rushed for 1,128 yards on 4.1 yards per carry. Marshawn Lynch finished with 1,257 yards and 4.2 yards per carry.
  • Seattle gave up 44 sacks on Russell Wilson this year and also sacked opponents 44 times. San Fran gave up only 39 sacks on Colin Kaepernick and got to the opposing QB 38 times this year.
  • Six Seahawks have 20 or more catches and four have been targeted more than 40 times. Conversely, only three 49ers have 20 or more catches and only two have been targeted more than 40 times.
  • The Seahawk defense intercepted 28 passes, recovered 11 of 20 forced fumbles and scored three touchdowns. San Fran’s defense had 18 interceptions, recovered 11 of 13 forced fumbles and also scored three touchdowns.
  • San Fran’s kick/punt returners averaged 22.7 return yards per kickoff and 8.9 per punt. The Seahawks’ kick/punt returners had 21.2 return yards per kickoff and 11.1 per punt. Neither team had or allowed a punt or kick return touchdown.
  • Candlestick Park averaged 69,732 fans per 49er home game – 99.3 percent of it’s 70,207 person capacity. CenturyLink Field averaged 68,197 fans per Seahawk home game – 101.8 percent of its 67,000 person capacity.
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One thought on “11 Fun Facts on ‘Get Pumped Up’ Day

  1. Pingback: 12 Things to Watch in NFC Championship | Twining's Take

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